Book Review: The Pussy, by Delicious Tacos

Book Review: The Pussy, by Delicious Tacos

Tl:dr

This book, The Pussy, is beautiful, stark and hilarious.  If you like Junky by William S. Burroughs; Rum Diary by Hunter S. Thompson, Crime and Punishment by Dostoevsky,  thrill rides, dark humor and aren’t easily offended, you should buy it and read it.

What is it about.

The Pussy, by Delicious Tacos is a collection of stream of consciousness diaries, short stories, fantasy, and commentary on dating and society. It’s random at times and doesn’t have a clear plot, but what it lacks in direction, it more than makes up for with engrossing inner conflict, revealing social observations and perfectly timed wit. The book is about a man in his late thirties confronting the fact that with no wife, no children, no money,  his existence may have been without purpose.

“No money no job no wife no kids no art no nothing. You have done nothing with your life. Maybe you kept the cat alive but come on, a monkey could raise a cat. Even the cat would be better off without you.”

Despite this pessimism the book doesn’t indulge in self-pity. The narrator is as matter of fact about the state of his affairs as he is about his desire for everything we aren’t supposed to want: the taboo, the illegal, the dangerous, the improper.  We are supposed to be shocked by this but it’s portrayed as the mundane, to be expected. The only reason we ourselves don’t admit our perverted obsessions and lack of faith in life, he suggests, is because we are liars and fakes.

“I am powerfully sexually attracted to underage girls. Far more than to women of legal age. If you aren’t say so in the comments. I’ll know everything else you say is also a lie.”

He is the only honest character in his world, and he is miserable. It’s not just that his own life lacks meaning and is driven by carnal urges but the overpriced, underwhelming society he inhabits also lacks significance as it is also driven by base desires: fear, greed and power.

Why should I read it.

The hook in reading is to indulge in the sensual roller coaster we are taken on. Many chapters, like “Worst Case Scenario” read as a deeply honest confessional. Others like “Can’t Live with ‘Em, Can’t Live without ‘Em” are a hilariously out of control anecdote. “Unemployment Diary: Want Ads” is poignant social commentary.

The momentum doesn’t rest on “what happens next?” but on what is he going to make me feel next? Shock? Revulsion? Aroused? Pity? Uncontrollable laughter?  The narrator is equal parts strange and familiar, though no one wants to admit just how often we feel just like the narrator feels. It’s our dirty secret we indulge in while reading lines like,

“This is why I can’t have kids … I don’t need more things to love and be afraid of losing.”

Or where he admits our inherently pessimistic nature:
“Of course it would be like this. You meet a nice girl and then die from your asshole.”

All the normal habits and happenings of regular life are omitted. The book only captures the highs and lows and as such we are hooked on the roller coaster of the narrator’s constant drive to either fully engage in life, sex, introspection or to escape it.

What is the point.

What gives the story edge and momentum is conflict.  It is the narrator’s awareness that what he wants  he can not, or will not, allow himself to have.  Whether that is to impregnate a stranger, move to Montana or have a relationship Angela, he won’t move past fantasy. He does not want the prize. He does not want the finish line. He wants the race. He wants the struggle. Nothing else matters. The chase for a high (risky sex, conquest) or for escape, calm, quite and peace is all there is.

His obsession with sex is not with what we normally associate with sex: intimacy, pleasure. He’s obsessed with the conflict, the conquest and the intensity of it. He is obsessed with the dirty, animalistic, hidden side of sex, not the pure, romantic side sex that our culture tries to sell.  He wants unclean women, underage women, unknown women, disposable women. He wants his sex to climax right on the verge of a terrible mistake. He doesn’t fantasize about giving women pleasure or comfort, he fantasizes about pushing the limits, testing his will.  He gets off on the idea that the one thing that would give meaning and purpose to his life: to procreate would be the one thing that would ruin theirs.

If you strip man down to his base needs then offer him alternatively near fulfillment and assorted crutches but never give him exactly what he wants you would have the narrator of this book.  The twist is that this narrator himself refuses to give himself fulfillment.  That would ruin the fun. That would ruin the anguish. That would ruin the whole point of getting up every morning. You get the sense he is equally afraid of failure and success. Equally afraid of living and dying.

How about the writing.

While I love the anecdotes, humor and insights, what really hooked me is Delicious Taco’s writing style. It is bare but not simple. He is a master of tone and pacing. He is able to write about the larger issues in society, in work, in relationships with an objective eye, paring it down to the basics of how, ultimately, everything is trying to screw you over. You don’t matter. You are a cog.  Then moments later he will breathe life into a moment so small and personal it would seem forgettable but instead it reveals as much about human nature, suffering, and the struggle to find satisfaction in this backwards modern world.

For example, in a brilliant passage that captures an incredibly relatable and human moment, the narrator describes texting the woman he loves but can’t have. He shows in this passage how much effort and thought is put into appearing to put in no effort or thought.

“He was going to text the girl if the date didn’t pan out. what are you doing. All lower case no punctuation. Taking the capital “W” off “what” required more work than just letting the phone auto-correct, but gave the appearance of nonchalance. what are you doing

In this screwed up modern world, nothing is more despised than blatantly wanting, needing or caring. Unless what you want is taboo. Then go for it.

In “Fetish” he describes his fantasy to have a completely ordinary relationship with a woman he loves and who loves him back. “It’s sick, I know. But that’s what I need to stay hard.”

Delicious Tacos’ pacing and wit can’t be matched. His delivery is perfect and will give you fits of laughter. This isn’t the kind of book that will put you to sleep. It’s the kind of book that will keep you up all night turning to the next page and wondering, How is it possible that the fucked up parts of life are so fabulous? And why the hell do we try so hard to make life pristine when it’s the grit and dirt that gives it meaning?

“In the end you gave me what I want: to be miserable. So I can keep writing shit that brings more girls to make me miserable.”

In conclusion: ten thousand stars.   Follow his blog here and buy The Pussy here.

 

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